The Psychology of Roses

We are pleased to say that we are now open to the general public, with distancing restrictions etc. in place.  If you wish to come and selection your own plants then allow plenty of time as only 3 people or 3 couples will be allowed in the compound at any one time. Hours Monday to Friday 9-1 2-4.30 Sat 9-4.

If preferred we will be happy to put plants for collection out for you so that you do not have to come into the office or sales area. We have a good selection of containerised roses, many just getting ready to bloom.   Dispatch of orders continue as usual. In these difficult times if possible please place your order online.

 

The psychology of roses (and other blooms)

Why are we so attracted to roses and other flowers?

Psychologists have been studying their emotional impact and have identified several changes in the brain when subjects are presented with roses.

A USA study found a clear correlation between changes in the left and right prefrontal cortex and on autonomic nervous activity as shown by measuring heart rate variability (HRV) and heart rate.

These changes were interpreted as showing a significant increase in perceptions of feeling ‘comfortable,’ ‘relaxed,’ and ‘natural;’ and a significant improvement in mood state.

The scientists concluded that visual stimulation with roses induces physiological and psychological relaxation.

A study into the effects of exposure to roses carried out in Tokyo among 31 male office workers at Mizuho Information & Research Institute, revealed similar effects. They were exposed to unscented roses while a control group was not.

It found: “Among subjects exposed to roses, the high-frequency component of heart rate variability was significantly higher than in controls. Similarly, ‘comfortable,’ ‘relaxed’ and ‘natural’ feelings were more common in subjects exposed to roses.”

We are familiar with the phrase “stop and smell the roses”, but now there is evidence of the psychological benefits.

Among the explanations for these results is that in an increasingly high-tech, office-based lifestyle exposure flowers reconnects us with nature:

According to behavioural research conducted at Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, nature provides us with a simple way to improve emotional health – flowers. The presence of flowers triggers happy emotions, heightens feelings of life satisfaction and affects social behaviour in a positive manner far beyond what is normally believed.”

So now you know. Roses have a positive effect on your emotional and mental well-being!

Cultivation tips for June

Roses will be due their second feed of a slow release fertilizer around the end of June, and no later than mid-July.

At present there seem to be a lot of aphids around (this can change instantly so do invest in a recommended insecticide. Do not be tempted to use washing up liquid as this can damage the surface of the leaves and make them more susceptible to disease.

To promote and lengthen the flowering period regular dead-head and prune back the flowered stems to the first FIVE-LEAF formation.

Be on the lookout for suckers that can sap energy from your plants. Suckers are light green with few thorns and light green foliage and come from below the union of the cultivated rose and under stock. Locate the source of the sucker (it may be necessary to dig the soil away) and cleanly remove. Standards can produce suckers on their stems, and these should be cut away as soon as they appear with a sharp knife.

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